Archive for March, 2014

March 29, 2014

“It’s like I’m reading a book… and it’s a book I deeply love. But I’m reading it slowly now. So the words are really far apart and the spaces between the words are almost infinite. I can still feel you… and the words of our story… but it’s in this endless space between the words that I’m finding myself now. It’s a place that’s not of the physical world. It’s where everything else is that I didn’t even know existed. I love you so much. But this is where I am now. And this who I am now. And I need you to let me go. As much as I want to, I can’t live your book any more.”

Samantha, Her
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March 29, 2014

“It’s like I’m reading a book… and it’s a book I deeply love. But I’m reading it slowly now. So the words are really far apart and the spaces between the words are almost infinite. I can still feel you… and the words of our story… but it’s in this endless space between the words that I’m finding myself now. It’s a place that’s not of the physical world. It’s where everything else is that I didn’t even know existed. I love you so much. But this is where I am now. And this who I am now. And I need you to let me go. As much as I want to, I can’t live your book any more.”

Samantha, Her
via:demo:abi

March 24, 2014

Wes Anderson: A Mini Documentary (by Paul Waters – BEC)

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March 24, 2014

Wes Anderson: A Mini Documentary (by Paul Waters – BEC)

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March 24, 2014

Wes Anderson: A Mini Documentary (by Paul Waters – BEC)

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March 23, 2014

insequential:

George Harrison’s fish-eye selfies

India, 1966

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March 23, 2014

Wes Anderson // Centered (by kogonada)

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March 8, 2014

The Fox & Mr. Anderson (by criterioncollection)

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March 5, 2014

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March 4, 2014

showslow:

The Effects of Time Revealed by People Posing Next to Photos Taken Decades Apart by Ana Oliveira

Identities by Ana Oliveira is a joyous exploration of the toll of time. Ana asked senior citizens to find their most treasured portraits from their young adulthood, and then she recreated the portraits in the modern time. The side-by-side display of the portraits is stunning. There is no doubt it is the same person as you see the similarities in bone structure and eyes, but time has played its games on each of the people. The eyes are the most telling part in each picture, where you can still see the love of life shining out, even though the faces have changed.

Identities I covers people in many different age ranges, but the most stunning portraits are of seniors where up to 60 years in time have elapsed from the original portrait.

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